North Dakota Pottery Collectors Society

 

 

 

                                                              C.C.C. Ceramics
                                                                                  
By Arley Olson

 

Camp 2775V-C.C.C. (Civilian Conservation Corps) located south of Mandan, North Dakota started restoration of Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park July 1934. Camp educational adviser, F. A. Nunn introduced a ceramics program to the camp. In a camp newsletter of August 1939 the ceramics/pottery program made several hundred articles the past year. The potter’s wheel was used for making bowls, pictures, jugs etc. Moulds were used for making animals and flower pots. Much of the pottery was decorated in colors using a colored mineral oxide base. Some of the clay products were burned in out door kilns. In the fall of 1939 plans were being studied for the construction of a kerosene or gas kiln.       

Civilian Conservation Corps was created in April 1933 and was active thru June 1942. The Corps was specifically intended for the purpose of relieving the widespread unemployment and distress existing in the United States. At the same time it was to provide for the restoration of the country’s depleted natural resources (lands, forests, and parks) and the advancement of an orderly program of useful public works.

Most C. C. C. camps were made up of enrollees between the ages of seventeen and twenty three, but to help the pressing problem of unemployed World War I veterans some camps were made up of veterans. These camps were designated with the letter “V” in the camp number and it was this type of camp that was at Fort Lincoln State Park, Mandan, ND.        

                                                                                  The lion is 7" long and stamped on the bottom in black

                                                                                                COMPANY 2775 V-CCC
                                                                                                  MANDAN, N. DAK.

 

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Last modified: 05-08-17